What is the best to eat before a workout in the gym


Day after day, you work on your body to achieve the shape you dream of. Eating right before your workout is vital to achieving results. In this article, we will tell you what is best to eat before training in the gym so that progress will not be long in coming.

What is the best to eat before a workout in the gymWhat is the best to eat before a workout in the gym

Day after day, you work on your body to achieve the shape you dream of. Eating right before your workout is vital to achieving results. In this article, we will tell you what is best to eat before training in the gym so that progress will not be long in coming.

Many people underestimate or misunderstand the importance of one of the key success factors in fitness – eating right before exercise.

By adjusting the timing and ingredients of this snack, you will see and feel the difference. Your workout performance will increase, your body will become leaner, tighter and more muscular, and you will recover faster.

Eating before exercise: general rules

What to do if 2-3 hours before training and you are very hungry? You have no desire to have a large meal, you just need to satisfy your hunger and energize your body for a full workout. You can mix a protein shake, but it may not always replace solid foods. But training with a full stomach is not the best option either.

There is a solution. All you need to do is choose the right snack time, serving sizes and food mix. Here are some guidelines to follow with this important meal:

1. Eat solid food 2-3 hours before training. During this time, the food will have time to digest and the nutrients will enter the bloodstream.

2. A small snack in the range of 150-350 kcal will satisfy the body’s needs for nutrients without overloading the hormonal and digestive systems.

3. To increase endurance and ensure optimal hormone levels, consume “slow” carbohydrates. Simple sugars trigger the release of insulin, which reduces the body’s ability to burn fat. In addition, fast carbohydrates can cause hypoglycemia, causing dizziness and fatigue. Complex carbohydrates keep blood sugar levels constant and prevent hormonal surges.

Useful article: Insulin and carbohydrates – effects on muscle mass and fat storage

4. Choose sources of protein that are high in tyrosine. This amino acid stimulates the production of neurotransmitters (adrenaline and dopamine), which provide the feeling of alertness and excitement necessary for sustained motivation and productive training.

5. Opt for foods that are low in fat. Eating fatty foods increases fatigue and decreases response within 2–3 hours.

Protein Before Workout: What and How Much to Eat

To calculate your protein requirement, multiply your weight in kilograms by 0.15-0.25. Example: A 81 kg person needs 12–20 g of protein before training.

For protein sources, choose lean, low-fat foods that contain tyrosine and other amino acids that stimulate neurotransmitter production.

Here are some foods that are high in tyrosine:

  • egg white;
  • cottage cheese;
  • fish: tuna and cod are the best choices, salmon is also suitable, but it has more fat (about 6 g per 100 g);
  • turkey;
  • seaweed, spirulina;
  • beef;
  • chicken breast;
  • game meat.

Read also: The basics of amino acid metabolism in the body

Choosing carbohydrates

To calculate the amount of carbohydrates, multiply your weight by 0.25-1. Example: A person weighing 81 kg should eat 20–80 g of carbohydrates in a pre-workout meal.

Choose “slow” carbohydrates that are low in fiber.

Fiber is great for other meals, but large amounts of it can cause digestive upset before exercise.

Try to eat carbohydrates that are high in amylose (slow-digesting starch) and low in amylopectin (fast-digesting starch).

Foods high in amylose:

  • potatoes;
  • whole wheat bread;
  • oat flakes;
  • pasta;
  • fig.

Useful article: What are good carbohydrates? Proper nutrition

Tip: Don’t blindly rely on the system of dividing carbohydrates into simple and complex ones. There are many so-called complex carbohydrates, such as maltodextrin, which are quickly digested and absorbed, causing a spike in insulin, just like simple sugars.

Useful article: 9 foods to eat before exercise

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